How Land Surveying and Town Planning Have Shaped the Evolution of Canberra

From Bush Capital to Bustling City: The Vital Role of Land Surveying and Town Planning in Canberra’s Evolution

The capital city of Australia, Canberra, has come a long way since its creation in 1913. It was initially planned as a bush capital, intended to be a grand, symbolic city that was both functional and aesthetically pleasing. To achieve this, the government employed the services of two surveyors, Charles Scrivener and Walter Burley Griffin, to survey and design the layout of the city. The result of their efforts was a city that was well-planned, with a number of features that are still used today. This article will explore the role of land surveying and town planning in Canberra’s evolution, from a bush capital to a bustling city.

Surveying and Planning the City

The first step in the process of creating a city is surveying the land. This involves taking accurate measurements of the land and its features, such as mountains, rivers, and valleys. This data is then used to create a map of the area that can be used to plan the city’s layout.

In the case of Canberra, the two surveyors Scrivener and Griffin had different approaches to the task. Scrivener took a more traditional approach, producing a plan that was based on a grid system. Griffin, on the other hand, took a more modern approach, producing a plan that was based on a series of ‘radial’ lines that connected the city centre to the surrounding areas.

Once the survey was complete, the next step was to create a plan for the city. This involved deciding where roads, parks, and other features should be located. It also involved making decisions about the city’s aesthetics, such as the style of buildings, street names, and the overall look of the city.

The Ongoing Role of Surveying and Planning

The role of surveying and town planning in Canberra’s evolution has not ended with its initial creation. As the city has grown and developed, new areas have been surveyed and planned, and existing areas have been modified and improved.

The most visible example of this is the development of the Parliamentary Triangle, which began in the early 1920s. This area was planned and surveyed to create a space that was both aesthetically pleasing and functional, with a number of key landmarks, such as the National Library of Australia and the National Gallery of Australia, being located within the triangle.

The city has also undergone a number of other changes, such as the expansion of suburbs and the construction of new roads. All of these changes have been made possible through the ongoing work of surveyors in Canberra and planning of the city.

The Impact of Surveying and Planning

The role of land surveying and town planning in Canberra’s evolution cannot be overstated. The surveyors and planners of the early days laid the foundations for the city we see today. Their work has allowed for the growth and development of the city, enabling it to become the bustling metropolis it is today.

The importance of surveying and planning is not limited to Canberra. Across Australia, cities and towns have been planned and surveyed, with the results having a significant impact on the development of those areas. As such, surveying and planning remain an essential part of the process of creating a city.

Conclusion

Canberra is a city that has come a long way since its creation in 1913. The role of land surveying and town planning in this evolution has been vital, allowing the city to grow and develop into the bustling metropolis it is today. The ongoing surveying and planning of the city ensures that its development remains on the right track, and that it remains a place where people can live, work, and enjoy life.